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Author Topic: Rifle Exercises  (Read 4025 times)
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Muddogg
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« on: April 19, 2007, 07:42:25 PM »

Fred has asked us before to practice lying in the prone several times before an appleseed to get us used to staying in the prone for a long time, and it is very good advice, even for us younger folk. 

Also, I would like to add that you also try to strengthen your upper body's endurance, because even an 8 pound rifle can feel like a bucket of water when you hold it up long enough! There are some great exercises that you and your favorite rifle can do together! But, before you do this, make sure that you: 1)Have your doctor's permission if you have medical problems, 2)Make sure the rifle is unloaded, and 3)take your sling off as it may get caught.

Here are some illustrations to help some of you out:
http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a326/Muddogg/rifle_exercise.jpg

First Exercise:

Hold your rifle in front of you horizontally, about 4 inches out from your chest. This is the starting position.
Moving with a fluid motion, lift the rifle over your head extending your arms.
Slowly drop the rifle behind your head, but be careful not to knock your knoggin.
Lift the rifle over your head again, reversing the process then back to the starting position.
This can be one repetition, however, you can do a little more if you want.
Push the rifle away from you by extending your arms, then pull it back into the starting position again, counting as one rep.
Do 9 more repetitions. Rest 1-5 minutes before doing another set, and 10 before doing another upper body exercise.

Second exercise:

Holding the rifle vertically in your dominant arm extended to the side, with your other arm extended as well is the starting position.
Move both arms and rifle to the middle of your body, without bending your elbows, and both hands should grasp the rifle.
Removing your dominant hand from the rifle back to the side, the other hand should extend to the side with the rifle to look like a mirror image of the starting position.
Now, reverse until the rifle is extended to side again in your dominant arm, which counts as one rep.
Do 9 more repetitions. Rest 1-5 minutes before doing another set, and 10 before doing another upper body exercise.

Once you do 3 sets of 10 reps, you can then decide if you want to do more than that next time. If you decide that it seems easy in the first set, by the middle of the second set you will regret doing more. You might not even be able to do a third set. Also, if you can't do 3 sets of ten, keep working everyday until you can.  You can practice this around 2 times a day, once in the the morning and again in the evening if you want. Always remember to drink water beforehand to stay hydrated while you exercise.


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-The Muddogg
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« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2007, 07:58:19 PM »

Most excellent suggestion.  I guess you could start with an AR and work your way up to a garand.   Grin

I have also heard that bayonet exercises are really helpful for building upper body strength (thrusts, slashes, etc), but have never found quality information on the topic.  Supposedly, it was standard training all the way from the revolutionary war to the late 1950s.  Have you ever come across information on this?
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Muddogg
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« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2007, 06:26:16 PM »

I've never heard of bayonet practice being used purposely for exercise, but it is possible.  It's more like an aerobic exercise, but I can show people the moves if they want me to(you might want to stretch your muscles beforehand so you don't get a cramp).

We only did a training exercise to learn how to do it the day before the range, were we were two arms length apart from each other on one side of the field and staggered likewise on the other side of the field. The Drill Sergeant called out the move and we would take a step with the move, toward each other. Then we would pass them, about-face and do it again until we all got it down.
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fred
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« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2007, 12:46:43 AM »


     I can see where once you get to the Garand level of weight, you MIG want to attach an extra one- and then two-pound weight (and keep adding more) to your rifle under the theory that practice with a heavier weight will lead to an even 'lighter' rifle and less fatigue in using it...
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« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2007, 11:27:13 AM »

Can recall in younger days these were a small part of
several different early morning exercises in boot.  Nothing
attached with bayonet drills for exercise other than to beat
your opposition.   Pulgal sticks made for a fun or get even
skills.
   Good mornings exercises continued with advanced and
indiviual combat training.   One in four had twenty pound
BARs.   Sure was hell on finding shirts to fit after a couple
of months of that.   It did make a Garand feel like a carbine Grin
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raf
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« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2007, 03:56:35 PM »

Work out with the appropriate bar bell-type weights.  Your local gym should be able to advise you, or purchase a book on the subject.
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« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2007, 04:08:47 PM »

I cannot imagine barbells being more fun than an M1A or M1.
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scoutforrogers
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« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2007, 05:57:11 PM »

I am glad this got posted since I was thinking about this last night when I was shooting. I do manual labor everyday, but I was still a little weavilly when I was shooting from the standing position with my M1. Especially if I missed making my shot in the sequence and had to got through it again before shooting.

Also, I read you guys advice about using elbow pads, but had never remembered having any need for them. After I shot 300 rds of .22 mag last night prone with my bolt action, I tore  a thick quarter size piece of skin from my elbow. I didn't realise I was doing it untill I got home and it was in a wad hanging on by a small thread.  I was keeping my cheek on the stock and  elbows down and just rolling on my elbow to work the bolt.

I will have to get a new sight for it since it is one of those square orange glow ones and even at 25 meters it is four inches across on the paper.
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